Assassins Creed: Revelations boxart

Assassins Creed: Revelations

8.1 reviews

Assassin’s Creed Revelations follows master assassin Ezio Auditore as he walks in the footsteps of his legendary mentor, Altaïr, on a journey to recover five ancient seals that hold the keys to the future of the Assassins brotherhood. It is a perilous path – one that will take Ezio to Constantinople, the heart of the Ottoman Empire, where a growing army of Templars threatens to destabilize the region.

Genre Action Adventure
Platforms PS3  Also on PC  Xbox 360 

Developer Ubisoft Montreal Publisher Ubisoft Release Date Nov 15, 2011

Assassins Creed: Revelations Reviews PS3 

Showing 15 of 15 reviews View all

9.3 reviews

3djuegos.com review
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9.2 reviews

vandal.net review
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9.1 reviews

gamerevolution.com review
So long as Ubisoft maintains their level of yearly iteration, introducing new gameplay elements, keeping what works, fixing or cutting what fails, and adding onto the absolutely stellar multiplayer component, things are looking very high for Assassin's Creed 3. Until then, it's nice to visit our old friends Altaïr and Ezio Auditore... even if they are a little long in the tooth.
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9 reviews

thesixthaxis.com review
Assassin’s Creed is a series that deserves to live as long as possible if Ubisoft are releasing games of this calibre year after year; Revelations is a brilliant entry into the series and brings so much to the table that it beats not only the other games in the series, but many other games that have released this year or last.
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9 reviews

gameblog.fr review
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9 reviews

playstationlifestyle.net review
Revelations is a fantastic game, and is more than worth your money, but a repetitive mission structure and the fact that the game is still following Ezio is rather disappointing. Overall, the positives far outweigh the negatives, with the game an improvement over Brotherhood in almost every way, making it one of this holiday’s must-haves.
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9 reviews

strategyinformer.com review
We really have been spoilt this year. With the release of Revelations, Ubisoft have finally turned their initial concept into a truly unmissable game. Pulling the narrative together alongside some vital gameplay additions, this is the best, most complete Assassin's Creed title to date. In the space of four years, the series has turned it's infantile expectation into a showing of maturity and extreme class. It seems the developers have grown up alongside their assassins, nurturing the series with enough confidence and pizazz to execute a top contender for game of the year.
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8.8 reviews

gameinformer.com review
Despite starring in three Assassin’s Creed games in as many years, Ezio hasn’t worn out his welcome with me. Revelations doesn’t deviate drastically from the formula established by Brotherhood, but I still love the stealth, intrigue, and action at the heart of the series. The city of Constantinople is a worthy successor to picturesque settings like Venice and Rome, and the accompanying narrative resolves many of the lingering mysteries in a (mostly) satisfying way. Returning systems, like building an army of assassins and gaining control of districts, are deeper and more addicting than ever. The addition of bombs and the hook blade don’t add as much to combat as I had hoped, but they don’t detract from the fun of chain-killing a posse of Templars. The tower-defense minigame (which is completely awful) is the only place where Revelations’ design stumbles, but you don’t need to suffer through it as long as you keep your notoriety under control – which isn’t difficult if you make it a priority. Apart from that sore spot, Revelations has a compelling plot, several memorable moments, and cool multiplayer additions. It has everything fans expect...but I hope that the next installment has a few more surprises.
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8.5 reviews

ign.com review
Almost equal to finding Altair's keys are the chapters that feature Altair himself. Each major portion of the game includes a segment with Ubisoft's original assassin, and players will relive specific moments throughout his life, ranging from a very young age to much older. Some of these missions feel very similar to Ezio's, while others are decidedly different. The variety helps keep things fresh, as does the fact that they're very story-driven and help bring a certain amount of meaning and weight to what Ezio is doing. By the end of the game, you'll see similarities between the two men - as well as differences - which help form one of the key emotional cores of the entire experience.
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8.3 reviews

1up.com review
ACR is at its best when it's a period piece about navigation and assassination. To wit, when I'm controlling either Ezio or Altair as I weave around a city and stab numerous fools in the face, or even when I take my assassination skills online (be warned, as a pure consumer heads-up: ACR utilizes an online pass for multiplayer; new copies have a single-use code to access online multiplayer), ACR plays like a supremely refined ancient assassination sim. When it strays from what makes it so great -- whether by adding out-of-place genres/mechanics or the few times it attempts to pull off an Uncharted-style setpiece (specifically, the chariot chase in the beginning, or a goofy chariot-parachute-assassination sequence later on) -- it suffers. While Revelations lacks that one supreme improvement or standout mechanic that defined AC2 and Brotherhood each, it's still a damn fine sendoff for Altair and Ezio. I just hope that Assassin's Creed 2012, whatever it ends up being called, feels more like the revolutionary leap from AC1 to 2 rather than the continued evolutionary steps of "Ezio's Trilogy."
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7.4 reviews

cheatcc.com review
I really wanted to love this game. As a huge fan of the series, I was beyond hyped for the last entry featuring Ezio and the first to blend the three heroes' stories together. However, the game lacks a coherent story, visual polish, and meaningful new gameplay elements. Though running around and stabbing people is still fun, Revelations has lost some of the spark that made its predecessors feel so amazing. I hope the series can get itself back on track soon, because I know the Assassin's Creed series can do better than this. I'm just sad to see that Ezio's last story was not his finest hour, because he deserved a better exit than this.
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7 reviews

videogamer.com review
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7 reviews

next-gen.biz review
Elsewhere, Revelations is defined by the slightest of incremental improvements. Bomb crafting is smartly implemented as you pick recipes and gather ingredients, and there’s an amusing sense that Ezio’s behaving as a perky barman rather than a master killer. It’s hardly game-changing, though, even if it does give you new options – distract, confuse, destroy – during combat and stealth. The Hookblade, meanwhile, introduces a little complexity to the traversal, allowing you to leap higher and farther and even slide on ziplines. It speeds up both movement and fighting, but it’s another minor embellishment; it’s still the animation that makes AC sing, conveying a majestic blend of agility and effort while you sit back and hold down a few buttons.
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7 reviews

eurogamer.se review
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5 reviews

gamer.no review
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