Deus Ex: Human Revolution boxart

Deus Ex: Human Revolution

9.2 reviews

Deus Ex: HR is a prequel and set in the year 2027 (before the events of DX1). One day, the path of Jensen's life is unexpectedly changed as a team of Black-Ops commandos break into his company's headquarters and (using a security plan from Jensen's own hand) a mass slaughter ensues. From there on out, Jensen is caught up in a conspiracy that's going to see him struggling for his life.

Genre First-Person Shooters
Platforms Xbox 360  Also on PC  PS3 

Developer Eidos Montréal Publisher Eidos Interactive Release Date Aug 23, 2011

Deus Ex: Human Revolution Reviews Xbox 360 

Showing 20 of 20 reviews View all

10 reviews

thecontrolleronline.com review
Deus Ex: Human Revolution is one of most well crafted games you’ll ever play. The detail that went into every little thing is astounding. From the detailed environments, to the voice acting, to the hacking system, I just couldn’t put it down. Eidos Montreal has put other studios on notice; action games should have length and depth, not just a high body count. Or maybe it should be ‘your RPG should have more explosions and cyborg ninjas’. I can’t decide.
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10 reviews

incgamers.com review
Despite the quality of the combat, the emphasis on gameplay options, the diverse set of augmentations and the substantial side-missions, what will stay with me about Human Revolution is its focus on creating a rich, believable world filled with interesting characters, themes and conflicting ideals. The mere fact that it aims for such lofty narrative heights is commendable, the fact that it achieves them is worthy of celebration.
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10 reviews

gamingnexus.com review
It may have taken them 10+ years, but Ubisoft has finally delivered the true sequel to Deus Ex that fans have been waiting for. Human Revolution may not be as ground-breaking as the original game was in terms of its gameplay elements, but it does an excellent job extending on the firm foundation of the original and delivers a gaming experience that is as enjoyable as it is memorable. The game is simply quality, through and through, from nearly ever angle. There is no doubt that this will be considered one of t he best games of the year, and possibly of the console generation. What are you waiting for? Get out there and get yourself a copy...
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10 reviews

totalvideogames.com review
Criticisms have also been made of the bosses (specifically that it's impossible to beat them without using violence) and we'll concede that some shots do need to be fired in anger. Nonetheless, there are stealthy way-rounds (very long and sometimes arduous ones, we'll admit) that allow you to defeat each boss with minimal violent actions. Loading screens also take some flak because they happen often and for long periods. All things considered then, why are we giving it a 10 if it's not perfect? Because it's the best FPS we've played in years, and that's enough.
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10 reviews

gamesradar.com review
As far as single-player experiences are concerned, DX:HR is one of the absolute best of this console generation. Unless you insist on having some kind of multiplayer mode, or hate reading, there's no reason you won’t enjoy DX:HR. While it’s slightly more linear than the original, the level of polish and effort that have gone into it more than make up for it. Eidos Montreal has successfully blended the best of both worlds, rebooting a classic franchise without losing the core of what made the original beloved.
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9.7 reviews

worthplaying.com review
No matter what genre of play you prefer, Deus Ex: Human Revolution is bound to fit the bill. It is a brilliantly constructed game that sets up a world and then sets the player loose, allowing you to explore as you see fit. From the art direction to the genre-bending gameplay, Deus Ex: Human Revolution is a landmark in game design that is sure to be referenced in the years to come. Buy it without hesitation.
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9.5 reviews

gamefront.com review
Ultimately, DXHR is just a joy to play, despite its somewhat anti-climactic final level and its slight tendency to overpower the player as time goes on with a few too many augments, weapons and credits. It would be a great game without its narrative; it would be a great narrative without its gameplay. Melded together, DXHR becomes the premier single player experience this year, and possibly for the last few years. Maybe even for this whole console hardware generation. This is a game you must play.
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9.5 reviews

strategyinformer.com review
Coming from a background of having not played the original Deus Ex (so sue me), I can't comment from a fans perspective. Being a prequel, there are hints and subtle nods as to what's to come in the first game – although if I was a long-term fan, I'd probably want more – but this seems a fairly self-contained experience. Make no mistake though, franchise fan or not, this is a good game – challenging, addictive, immersive... provided you like stealth-based action – there hasn't been an action/RPG this good in a long while.
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9.4 reviews

actiontrip.com review
My God, what do we have here? This appears to be a game with an intriguing intro, solid plot structure, convincing story and cool characters. That's quite an achievement for a game that steps bravely into the sci-fi genre.
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9.1 reviews

gamerevolution.com review
Exactly right, which is why a balanced approach works well on a first playthrough. Oftentimes sneaking past enemies devolves into getting spotted and fighting them off, while constantly fighting them may lead you to seek out respite in an air vent or under a desk for a breather.
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9 reviews

ign.com review
While Deus Ex: Human Revolution can't be the revelation that Deus Ex was in 2000, it's an achievement nonetheless. It's a visionary, considered piece of work, and while my thoughts drift to the things that could have been and the compromises made due to the possibilities of video games in 2011, they're just as quick to consider playing through it again. Human Revolution is a smart, rewarding piece of transhumanist noir that does justice not just to Deus Ex, but to the fiction that inspired it.
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9 reviews

thesixthaxis.com review
It’s obvious how much time Eidos Montreal has spent on Deus Ex: Human Revolution and behind the wonderful design is a solid game with a plot that will keep you guessing. This is a quality product in the same class as Dead Space 2 and Assassin’s Creed: Brotherhood and I’m sure it will be in many of the 2011 awards lists.
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9 reviews

1up.com review
With DEHR serving as the first major title of the release season, we decided to take up the mantra of player choice by having three 1UP editors play through the game for review. What follows below is a discussion between editor-in-chief Jeremy Parish, executive editor Thierry Nguyen, and editorial contributor Ryan Winterhalter.
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9 reviews

videogamer.com review
Perhaps the strongest compliment I can pay Eidos Montreal is this: with its grand design, dynamic play and sheer wealth of ideas - not to mention its old-fashioned pre-occupation with air vents - Deus Ex: Human Revolution is reminiscent of the best efforts from the golden era of PC gaming at the end of the 90s. It's a modern release imbued with the finer qualities of an age gone by.
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9 reviews

joystiq.com review
Human Revolution is an imperfect, complex and ambitious reminder of what a game can be when it's unafraid.
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9 reviews

eurogamer.net review
Deus Ex: Human Revolution is probably not as perfect as I'm making it sound. Some of the rules about what's interactive and not seem quite arbitrary, which is a pretty blatant failing in a game which tries so hard to make you feel like you're not being restricted, and while the level design is clever and varied, the interior design definitely is not, and there's also a lot of repetition in the incidental details. Sure, it's important to hear some of those looping news broadcasts, but maybe make them longer than half a minute or record variations or something.
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9 reviews

3djuegos.com review
No Synopsis Available
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8.8 reviews

planetxbox360.com review
The graphics are really outstanding for a game of this type, and the combat/stealth/social scenarios are second-to-none, giving you a wide range of choices, whether it’s how you play through the game or adapt your body to make situations fare better in your favor. There’s replay value galore in that alone, which is more than enough to make you complete the main game, as well as try out the varying side missions. It’s definitely a worthwhile successor to Invisible War, and perhaps sets the stage for the next Deus Ex game to come. Let’s just hope it doesn’t take another eight years.
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8 reviews

gamerfuzion.com review
The plot of the game is to be admire in a world where everyone is finding a way to get augmentations you see humans that have augmentations and those that don’t. The game will not bored you as it keeps you involved throughout the whole game by hacking, making decisions, using stealth mode and collecting XP points to increase your augmentations and more. The games lacks in graphics, sound and during the gameplay the AI could have been smarter.
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8 reviews

darkzero.co.uk review
Deus Ex: Human Revolution is basically fantastic, and is probably one of the most engrossing games you’ll play this year. A lot of this is down to the world itself. If Resident Evil 4 is the El Topo of videogames, then Deus Ex: Human Revolution is the Blade Runner. Obviously. There’s a genuine sense (particularly in the hub worlds) that you’re wandering around a place that’s been degraded by man’s hubris. This feeling of decay is bolstered by a mournful, synth-led soundtrack and the game’s art style, blanketed in a saturated gold hue. On a superficial level it helps separate Deus Ex from the myriad of washed out looking military shooters. On another level though it buttresses with cynical, apocalyptic glee just how bad things have gotten in this world. The gold hue shows that man has gleefully pissed all over any semblance of humanity in the name of technological progress. A more elegant example is probably that the colour scheme is almost sun-drenched, as if to say mankind is flying too close to the sun like Icarus, and is about to fall on its fat augmented arse.
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