Final Fantasy XIII-2 boxart

Final Fantasy XIII-2

8.2 reviews

Set five years after the events of Final Fantasy XIII, XII-2 revolves around Serah Farron, a returning character from the original title, and a young boy Noel Kreiss, as both try to find Lightning who has disappeared into an unknown world.

Genre Role-Playing
Platforms Xbox 360  Also on PS3 

Developer Square Enix Publisher Square Enix Release Date Jan 31, 2012

Final Fantasy XIII-2 Reviews Xbox 360 

Showing 31 of 31 reviews View all

10 reviews

gamingnexus.com review
While I have been praising this game for most of the review, there are some flaws that do need to be brought up. Battles can get to be incredibly monotonous in the early stages as you roam. There isn’t too much monster diversity until later in the game, so players might find themselves grinding early and maybe getting a bit burnt out on battle after battle. The leveling system with the Crystarium, also, can be a bit confusing. Early on, I found it to be enjoyable, but as you progress further in level, you have to be careful as to just how much you are putting into specific roles with what you unlock. It is not a straight-forward system and it is possible to paint yourself in a corner, so to speak, without having to grind more. I am a little disappointed that the game has drastically cut back on playable characters in recent titles, but that is more of a personal opinion considering that Final Fantasy VI’s 14 playable characters is easily my favorite. Still, these are minor issues that do not take away from an overall amazing experience.
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9.1 reviews

vandal.net review
No Synopsis Available
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9 reviews

gamesradar.com review
Speaking of locations, we were nervous going into the sequel that many of the environments would be recycled from XIII, but XIII-2 features a surprisingly large array of new locales. And the places that are recycled don't feel like they've been thrown in lazily, since it makes sense story-wise that we'd have to revisit some old places, since it's still the same world after all. Many of the old locations have been totally transformed too, and the environments constantly play a silent part in telling the story through how they've changed in different time periods (and across alternate timelines).
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9 reviews

videogameszone.de review
No Synopsis Available
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9 reviews

insidegamingdaily.com review
’ll state this up front just so we’re on the same page: I’m a long-standing fan of the Final Fantasy series but I really didn’t like Final Fantasy XIII. I could go through a laundry list of problems I had with the game, but fundamentally it didn’t have any of the charm or personality I associate with the series. That’s why I’m overjoyed that Final Fantasy XIII-2 brought it all back. It’s fun, packed with content, and made me feel that old Final Fantasy magic again.
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9 reviews

oxmonline.com review
Maybe the best way to sum up Final Fantasy XIII-2 is with an oft-repeated line of dialogue from the game itself: “Change the future to change the past.” It’s not just a paradoxical plot point: FFXIII-2 repairs almost every problem with Final Fantasy XIII, delivering an experience that feels like what that original game should have been. If your faith in Final Fantasy has been damaged by past disappointment, playing FFXIII-2 will restore your excitement for the franchise’s future.
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9 reviews

teamxbox.com review
No Synopsis Available
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9 reviews

mondoxbox.com review
No Synopsis Available
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9 reviews

ztgd.com review
All in all, Final Fantasy XIII-2 is a really enjoyable game. If you didn’t like XIII, I’d still suggest that you give it a try. There are enough improvements to both exploration and combat to appease the old school FF players while keeping the game play fresh. If you’re a fan of Japanese RPG’s, you’ll love the game. Despite the story slowing down at times, the game is really impressive and a lot of fun to play.
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8.5 reviews

gamer.nl review
No Synopsis Available
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8.1 reviews

ausgamers.com review
While the story may still leave something to be desired, the overall graphics, drool-worthy cut-scenes and improvements to the Active Time Battle system are necessary changes to a franchise that is still showing its age and struggling to embrace modern RPG conventions. It hasn’t reached breaking point yet, but let’s hope future iterations take a few more chances to breathe new life into the series before it’s too late. Resting on your laurels can only get you so far…
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8 reviews

gamestm.co.uk review
But by this point, you’ve already had some fifty hours’ worth of enjoyment out of Final Fantasy XIII-2. The structure offers so much freedom in terms of exploration and approach as you work through the narrative that it’s hard to criticise its shortcomings once the credits have rolled. It’s a unique and interesting way of handling time travel in games too, and while XIII-2 might fall foul of all the usual time-hopping pitfalls (read: it’s really rather stupid at times) it’s hard to recall a sequel that makes such major changes to a great game and still manages to get things so right. If XIII was making a case for the quickest route from A to B being a straight line, XIII-2 instead argues that a time gate directly to your destination is both more practical and more interesting. We’re inclined to agree.
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8 reviews

meristation.com review
No Synopsis Available
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8 reviews

videogamer.com review
The game's breathtaking presentation, however, almost makes up for this lack of compelling narrative. Whatever criticisms one may level at XIII-2, only the most churlish could fault its visuals and soundtrack. Working from a slightly lighter palette than XIII, the developers have once again crafted a series of locales that stand as some of the most beautiful and unique vistas ever presented in the medium.
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8 reviews

guardian.co.uk review
The game's ATB (Active-Time-Battle) combat system has been slightly tweaked for the better. Unlike XIII, paradigm shifts don't cause a break in the action, battles don't end if the team leader dies and players can switch leaders mid-battle.
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8 reviews

g4tv.com review
For Final Fantasy XIII-2, Square Enix set out to correct the issues fans had with the first game, and they have succeeded across the board. With improvements to combat, exploration, and storytelling, it feels like this is the game that XIII should have been. But it isn’t just a sequel, as it carves out its own tale to stand among the Final Fantasy pantheon.
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8 reviews

gameinformer.com review
Listening closely to fan feedback can be dangerous for developers, since gamers have different – and often contradictory – opinions of what needs improvement. Final Fantasy XIII was a divisive entry in the series; from the story to the battles, every element of the game had its champions and detractors. In most respects, the team at Square Enix did a great job singling out and addressing the chief problems. Progression is player-driven, combat is even more entertaining, and an array of other adjustments makes it one of my favorite RPGs from a mechanical perspective. I just want all of that integrated with a story that isn’t laughable and borderline insulting, and that’s where Final Fantasy XIII-2 falters.
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8 reviews

ign.com review
Final Fantasy XIII-2 proves itself the better game, but it lacks the same focused storytelling employed in the original. It benefits from an improved battle system, open environments, and an overall level of polish that deserves a nod of respect. Despite its severe lack of closure, Final Fantasy XIII-2 still deserves your time, especially for a few poignant moments set at the end of days.
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8 reviews

oxm.co.uk review
The true paradox of Final Fantasy isn't a temporal one. It's how it can conjure a feeling that's a combination of love, hate, derision and awe. XIII-2 gets less love than XIII. And the simplification dampens the open awe of previous games. But it's still the dominant feeling. And the fact I finished the game with only a quarter of the collectible fragments and very little idea of where to find them? Well, I just can't wait for the FAQs to start coming out.
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8 reviews

worthplaying.com review
There's no doubt that Final Fantasy XIII-2 is a more purist-friendly game than the original due to the development team's tweaks and changes. There's a better sense of exploration because of the time traveling mechanic, and the removal of the leveling restrictions from the first title do much to instill a sense of freedom. While the battle system is mostly the same, the small changes make it deeper, even if it means that battles become more frantic. Traditional RPG players should be happy with the inclusion of staples like towns, side-quests, and NPCs with whom to converse. Even so, it does this at the expense of a less focused story, something that genre fans would lament since that is a major reason to play a game like this. There's enough good stuff here to recommend it to genre fans and fans of the previous game.
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8 reviews

xbox360achievements.org review
Final Fantasy XIII-2 does a lot of things right, but the basic storyline holds the whole thing back from being a world beater. There is still plenty to see and do here, and this is certainly a fun game to play with a number of standout moments along the way, but you never quite get drawn into the world in the same way as past Final Fantasy games. While it is nice to revisit Cocoon and Pulse one more time, it would be better if the next game had the same kind of fun and invention from the get go rather than having to rely on fans letting the developers know what was missing. Still as time hopping quests to save the world go, this one will hold your attention for some……..time. Sorry.
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8 reviews

eurogamer.es review
No Synopsis Available
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8 reviews

gamereactor.se review
No Synopsis Available
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8 reviews

gamekult.com review
No Synopsis Available
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8 reviews

gameblog.fr review
No Synopsis Available
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8 reviews

rpgfan.com review
I find myself oddly pleased with my playtime of Final Fantasy XIII-2. The game isn't long for those who want to just take down the story - perhaps 25 hours at most - but it was a mostly enjoyable experience. Regardless of my issues, I kept playing the game, which is something I can't say about Final Fantasy XIII. If you go into the experience expecting a more traditional JRPG with the FFXIII battle system, you won't be disappointed. It's quirky, it's melodramatic, and it's convoluted, but I couldn't help but crack a smile during much of Final Fantasy XIII-2. It's a guilty pleasure for me - just like Quantum Leap.
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8 reviews

eurogamer.net review
No Synopsis Available
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7.7 reviews

computerandvideogames.com review
By listening to the fans' complaints and addressing the grave mistakes of the last game, Square Enix have succeeded in crafting a significantly better title than Final Fantasy XIII offered in 2010. But the design-by committee process has still fallen well short of recapturing the highs of the PlayStation 1 and PlayStation 2 games, relegating XIII-2 to the status of (yet another) one of the core series' less memorable entries.
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7.5 reviews

gamespot.com review
Square Enix should be commended for addressing Final Fantasy XIII's problems and for once again delivering a fun and highly playable RPG glowing with visual beauty and saturated with simple but universal sentiments. Nevertheless, the improvements feel less weighty than they might have--mechanical triumphs in a game that feels less than the sum of its parts. You won't perform awe-inspiring summons as a matter of course, and the ending--well, the ending isn't likely to leave you with the sense of closure you might want. Yet the monster collection and time-hopping freedom alone are enough to make it worth embarking on this enjoyable adventure. Just remember to keep your expectations in check: Final Fantasy XIII-2 isn't a timeless adventure in the grand tradition of the beloved series. But if you're curious to see the next stage in this ongoing tale, there's no reason you shouldn't chase after Lightning. After all, she can't defeat Caius without you.
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7.5 reviews

1up.com review
The problem is that all these factors lack a single unifying element or thesis. As a whole, the package doesn't come together nearly as well as FFXIII did. It's a mishmash of interesting systems and bold ideas that never quite gel. This probably shouldn't be entirely surprising given the involvement of co-developers tri-Ace, a studio whose entire catalog is defined by interesting systems and bold ideas that usually fail to cohere. In mimicking so many of the trends and styles of the current hot RPGs, FFXIII-2 frequently highlights how far it's removed from the cutting edge of the genre. Still, it's an encouraging step in the right direction; if nothing else, it at least demonstrates that Square Enix is open to other studios being involved in the production of its tentpole franchise and realize they can't expect to sell on name alone. Final Fantasy is sporting the clothes and attitude of its cooler peers; now it just needs to learn to wear them with confidence.
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6 reviews

joystiq.com review
Ultimately, if Final Fantasy XIII took the series five steps back, Final Fantasy XIII-2 takes it one hesitant step forward. Features like non-linear dungeons, optional side quests and NPC-populated towns are wonderful and all, but they were RPG staples twenty years ago. While Final Fantasy XIII-2 does quite a bit to fix the mistakes of its predecessor, it does very little to stand out on its own merits. It's enjoyable, but it's also disappointing in many ways. Final Fantasy deserves better.
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