Lord of the Rings: War in the North boxart

Lord of the Rings: War in the North

6.4 reviews

The game is based on the events taking place in the northern regions of Middle-earth. Players will take control of a hero of the war, and will be able to play through the game alone or cooperatively with other players.

Genre Role-Playing
Platforms Xbox 360  Also on PS3  PC 

Developer Snowblind Studios Publisher Warner Bros. Interactive Release Date Nov 01, 2011

Lord of the Rings: War in the North Reviews Xbox 360 

Showing 16 of 16 reviews View all

8.6 reviews

xboxaddict.com review
The lore of the Lord of the Rings is without question a font of characters, quests, adventures, battles, and most importantly, imagination. Venturing into new lands, engaging new enemies, making new friends while staying true to the canon and intertwining with events of Lord of the Rings, WitN sets out on a quest to deliver us one of the best action RPG Lord of the Rings experiences we have ever had. While a few things could use some revision work, overall this game is a masterpiece for Tolkien fans and shouldn't be missed. There's nothing like fighting through a massive battle in an iconic location to finish part of a quest and in the process find some amazing weapon or piece of armor that makes your character an even bigger threat against Sauron's forces. Prepare yourself to play a part in actions that will shape the history of all Middle Earth and all its inhabitants, prepare yourself for Lord of the Rings: War in the North.
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8.4 reviews

digitalchumps.com review
The issues themselves aren't bad, but they're noticeable. First, some aspects of the levels. There are several occasions where you are on a platform that is just a few feet taller than the floor below. You cannot simply run off of this platform and make a very realistic hop down, you instead my run over to where the stairs or ramp, or what have you, are. It's a bit of a letdown to see that type of strictness in the character movement ability, but these invisible walls are actually fairly common in the levels. When you run up to what looks like an alternate path or a secret area, only to be met with an invisible wall, it's annoying.
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8 reviews

rpgfan.com review
Lord of the Rings: War in the North is far from perfect, but it's an incredibly well-balanced beat-em-up. Despite all of the little criticisms, there wasn't anything that kept me from heartily enjoying my experience. Lord of the Rings and dungeon crawler fans alike should delight in Snowblind's latest title. I'm glad to see Snowblind return on a high note, and I'm readily awaiting what they'll do next.
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7.6 reviews

gamingtrend.com review
experience upgrades and looting – but the gameplay gets a bit worn the longer you play. So is the story enough of a draw to push this into the buy column for you? How about the prospect of having a game experience you and your friends can share? If neither of these things would push you from the undecided column to the must-buy column, approach this one with a bit more trepidation.
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7.5 reviews

nzgamer.com review
Lord of the Rings - War in the North rewards your curious nature by hiding gold and treasure chests in all of the various levels, meaning the more inquisitive you are the better the pay out. Unfortunately the AI won’t allow you to take advantage of these abilities, further emphasising the focus on co-op play with humans.
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7.5 reviews

worthplaying.com review
The Lord of the Rings: War in the North is a fun but flawed experience. From a technical standpoint, it has good graphics and sound, but there nothing about it is utterly amazing. From a gameplay standpoint, the action is great, but the rather lengthy adventure begins to get a bit stale because of the lack of real enemy diversity and the flow from combat to exploration to combat. While there could be some more depth to the RPG aspect, the game works and the addictive loot system keeps it engaging. Save for a few issues, co-op with the AI is quite good, and the whole thing improves when actual people are playing alongside you. With the deluge of big titles almost coming to a head, War in the North may get lost in the crowd, but if you're a fan of hack-n-slash gameplay with some substance, you'll be greatly satisfied with this title.
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7.5 reviews

xgn.nl review
No Synopsis Available
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7.5 reviews

ztgd.com review
Lord of the Rings: War in the North is a solid action RPG with plenty of loot to collect. I really got a sense of Champions of Norrath the more I played it, and wanted to continue grinding, which is uncommon for me. I loved playing co-op even with its setbacks, and honestly, since Crimson Alliance and Torchlight, I haven’t had this much fun in a game like this in years. Sure, it has shortcomings on all sides of the fence, but when you can lose five and six hour chunks of time without even noticing it, the game is certainly doing its job right.
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7.5 reviews

oxmonline.com review
On the other hand, thoughtful environmental details and enveloping ambient sound effects make these imaginary lands feel like real places, be it in the crypts of the Barrow-downs or the shadows of Mirkwood. Adding points to your stats has little impact from level to level, but as you travel hither and yon, constantly gathering new and improved gear as you go, you’ll find you’ve somehow grown from awkward newcomer to seasoned ass-kicker.
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7.5 reviews

1up.com review
A lot of people are going to overlook War in the North in favor of the plethora of amazing titles being released this season, and I completely understand why. In a time full of stellar sequels, it's difficult for anything new to stand out. But once the dust settles from the landslide of AAA autumn titles, The Lord of the Rings: War in the North will be there to provide a simple and fun way to satiate your loot-dropping addiction -- one eagle barrage at a time.
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7.2 reviews

game-boyz.co.uk review
At the end of the day, gamers who pick up War in the North will enjoy the online and offline co-op gameplay. This is where the game truly shines. Trudging through the game with a buddy is enjoyable and quite a challenge at times as well.
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5.2 reviews

cheatcc.com review
War in the North had full use of the Lord of the Rings movie license, and thus the visual elements draw heavily from the films. Even the characters look just how they did in the films; Elrond is Hugo Weaving, Aragorn is Viggo Mortensen, and Arwyn is Liv Tyler (sort of.) However, this makes it incredibly awkward when the voice actors sound nothing like their film version counterparts. To make things worse, too often the dialogue is buried in digital reverb and echo effects to the point of sounding almost robotic. Oh yes, and the words aren't synched with the characters' lips very well, which can be additionally off-putting.
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4.5 reviews

gameplanet.co.nz review
it’s about ordinary people exhibiting unsurpassed bravery and perseverance against impossible odds; it’s about people doing whatever it takes to prevent wrongdoing, even if they have no experience in what they’re called to do. War in the North, by being a blunt object of a hack-and-slash game with a facile story and an aversion to genuine characterisation, adds itself to the long list of Lord of the Rings games that just aren't Lord of the Rings games.
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4 reviews

eurogamer.net review
No Synopsis Available
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3 reviews

metro.co.uk review
War In The North is a bad idea poorly realised and as inept a use of an iconic licence as we've seen all year. Given how assiduously most high fantasy games crib from Tolkien it should be simplicity itself to make a worthwhile game based on his works, but nobody would ever want to imitate Lord Of The Rings games - only the original books and movies.
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2.5 reviews

avclub.com review
Especially galling are signs that folks really cared about making this game. The effort to maintain Peter Jackson’s tone is apparent; every piece of loot feels hand-painted in Alan Lee watercolors. And yet it’s all rendered meaningless through endless repetitive death.
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