Sleeping Dogs  boxart

Sleeping Dogs

8.4 reviews

Square Enix, Inc. today announced the upcoming open world cop drama Sleeping Dogs™ will go on sale August 14 in North America on the PlayStation®3 computer entertainment system, Xbox 360® video game and entertainment system from Microsoft and Windows PC.

Genre Action
Platforms PS3  Also on Xbox 360  PC 

Developer United Front Games Publisher Square Enix Release Date Aug 14, 2012

Sleeping Dogs Reviews PS3 

Showing 17 of 17 reviews View all

9.5 reviews

psx-sense.nl review
No Synopsis Available
Read Full Review

9.5 reviews

egmnow.com review
Unlike some of gaming’s more movie-minded adventures, Sleeping Dogs’ gripping narrative doesn’t detract from the action in the slightest, leaving us with one of the more playable, personable police quests of the modern era. It may not be as crass or flashy as some of its competitors, but Sleeping Dogs has a surprising amount of soul for a game of this ilk, offering a refreshing take on what’s possible from an open-world action title—and more depth than you can shake a tire iron at. Not bad for a game that almost didn’t make it out of the gate after Activision pulled the plug, eh?
Read Full Review

9 reviews

vandal.net review
No Synopsis Available
Read Full Review

9 reviews

eurogamer.es review
No Synopsis Available
Read Full Review

9 reviews

psu.com review
Sleeping Dogs is a beautiful game. Character models are quite well done, although no one seems to have the right size hands. Most of the men, Wei Shen in particular, seem to glow and glisten with sweat or rain or some kind of watery substance. It’s something that looks cool at the beginning, but you have to wonder if the guy just needs to take a break for a shower once in a while. They game mostly relies on dark colors to represent the dark underbelly of the city. While on occasions you’ll see brighter colors shine through when walking around temples or nightclubs, it’s mostly a dark game. Given the game mostly takes place in the rain; there’s a nice washed look to the buildings as you speed through the city in your motorcycle or sports car. This is definitely one of the better looking open-world games.
Read Full Review

9 reviews

playstationlifestyle.net review
The story of loyalty and inner turmoil is told through well-scripted dialog and expert voice acting during cutscenes. Combat, gunplay, and driving are each equally satisfying, well-balanced, and plenty. The living, breathing underworld of Hong Kong is expertly recreated. The sum of all of these parts give Sleeping Dogs that classic Hong Kong Kung Fu action flick vibe, putting you in the director’s chair. There may not be any multiplayer, however, the sheer volume of content and the added Social Hub will keep you playing long after the credits roll. Rockstar Games needs to take note and step their game up for Grand Theft Auto V—Sleeping Dogs has set the bar very high.
Read Full Review

9 reviews

g4tv.com review
With a cast featuring big names like Lucy Liu, Emma Stone, and Tom Wilkinson, the cinematic direction of the story flows wonderfully, creating a pacing that kept me engulfed in what would happen next until the brutally-violent final act. Between the wonderfully acted story and the tight car and gunplay, Sleeping Dogs is an exceptional open-world crime drama that ups the ante for cinematic story presentations -- and execution moves -- in games.
Read Full Review

9 reviews

officialplaystationmagazine.co.uk review
And just like in The Wire – without naming names – some of those you gain genuine affections for are dispensed with along the way, which only sucks you into the storyline further, keen to weed out the real bad guys and exact your own brand of bloody justice. With a script that wouldn’t look out of place in a John Woo movie (and indeed that pays homage to many of them – such as a quite brilliant hospital shootout inspired by Hard Boiled) and such intricately developed characters, it’s rare to finish a mission and not be desperate to push on into the next one.
Read Full Review

8.6 reviews

meristation.com review
No Synopsis Available
Read Full Review

8.6 reviews

psxextreme.com review
Sleeping Dogs is another winner for August. I admit that I remain on the fence about the story, those textures really are sub-par, and the camera has proven too irritating too many times. Therefore, I can’t quite say it’s an elite 9+ title. But I can say, beyond any shadow of a doubt, that I’m having such a blast. The epic brutality and intensity of the action, the rock solid control, the extremely well-balanced pacing, the singular, totally engrossing style and atmosphere, and the overall variety and diversity create a damn good game. It has its problems but I seriously doubt most action fans will be disappointed. I can almost guarantee enjoyment.
Read Full Review

8.5 reviews

3djuegos.com review
No Synopsis Available
Read Full Review

8 reviews

insidegamer.nl review
No Synopsis Available
Read Full Review

8 reviews

thesixthaxis.com review
Although the game is generally very easy, some of the larger group combat situations can be tricky to come through. Thankfully, the checkpointing system is smartly done in natural sections that are never too long so you’ll avoid thankless slogging through familiar areas. That said, there is still an element of the usual open world “drive here, pick something up, drive it there” flow to many of the missions. On a game map that’s reasonably large and bustling, and in a game with no helicopters or aeroplanes, driving from point A to point B to begin a mission, simply because the game transported you to a faraway safe house after your last, can be slightly tiresome if you’re just trying to work through the story missions.
Read Full Review

8 reviews

gameblog.fr review
No Synopsis Available
Read Full Review

8 reviews

play-mag.co.uk review
There’s a part of us that absolutely loves Sleeping Dogs – it’s exactly the kind of game we should see released every year. It’s a game you can lose yourself in for dozens of hours, one you can mess about in as much as you like, one that rarely frustrates and offers a fantastic distraction – an escape – from anything else that might be going on. It isn’t a brilliant game and there’s very little you won’t have seen before, but, given a chance, you can have a great deal of fun with Sleeping Dogs. You might learn some Cantonese swear words too, which is always handy.
Read Full Review

7 reviews

joystiq.com review
What struck me about Sleeping Dogs is how unoriginal its major components are. Fighting, driving, shooting, story, characters, sidequests: it has all been expertly sliced out of other media and put into place here. Other games are built on a similar "borrowing" philosophy, but it's rarely as obvious. Thankfully, Sleeping Dogs only encroaches the line of being completely derivative but – because it blends so many different ideas – it never crosses it. It's a good game, but Sleeping Dogs mostly leaves you remembering the media that inspired it and probably won't remain in your thoughts over time.
Read Full Review

6 reviews

edge-online.com review
When Activision axed production on what was planned to be the third entry in the True Crime series, CEO Eric Hirshberg said the title wasn’t “good enough” to compete in the fierce market of open-world games. The question, then, is whether new publisher Square Enix should have let this sleeping dog lie, and the answer is hazy. You’ll find well-executed entertainment here, some moments worth fighting for, but without the glue of a good script or the polish of a blockbuster to hold its disparate parts together, Sleeping Dogs feels as trapped as its hero. It’s incapable of committing fully to the action movie thrills it seems so enamoured of, perhaps due to the resources that have been siphoned away to fuel its open-world obligations and scale. Like an early Bruce Lee flick, Sleeping Dogs contains flashes of brilliance that stand out amidst an uneven whole. But, unlike Lee himself, it’s likely few will remember Sleeping Dogs as either an innovator or master, but merely a student of greater games.
Read Full Review