Super Hexagon Gets Cloned For The PC, Creator Is "Basically Alright" With It

Though he admits that he's "a little upset" that his official desktop released was beaten to the market.

by on 19th Nov, 2012

Both Super Hexagon, the recent iOS hit, and its creator, indie developer Terry Canavagh, have fans. Like Vittorio Romeo, who just released a clone of the aforementioned game, which he calls Open Hexaon. It's gotten a decent amount of attention, but not the good kind.

The PC port is virtually identical to the original, with just a few differences. That being the soundtrack, adjustable speed, and how it’s open sourced. Meaning users can create and share their own levels. But otherwise, they are the same game:

According to IndieGames.com, Romeo claims that it's not truly a clone:

"I want to make clear that the resemblance to the original game is very high, even if it's not an exact clone…. I've credited Terry Canavagh everywhere I could, and I don't want my game to be competition, but a tribute to his work. I got his permission to make a 'Super Hexagon inspired game,' I just hope this is not stretching it."

And it is true; Romeo did get the okay from Canavagh, yet most people are still bothered by the tribute. Mostly due to the fact that Canavagh’s own Super Hexagon port for the PC and Mac, has been somewhat cut at the knees:

"I'm a little upset that he released it before I had a chance to release Super Hexagon on PC myself - but I'm basically alright with it! I've just checked it out there, and it's not bad at all - the harder octagon stage was pretty cool. I also like the death effect. I'm hoping Super Hexagon will be out on PC and Mac REALLY soon"

Again, Canavagh is fine with Open Hexagon, but not his fans; many are annoyed by a fan stealing the thunder of someone he claims to respect so much. They also feel that Romeo should have waited till after Canavagh's offering was on the market before releasing his alternative in the wild.

Open Hexagon is freeware, so it costs no money to play, whereas the official offering will more than likely cost money (like the iOS version). Hence the disdain; some are afraid that potential sales might be lost because of this.

Then again, those who want a legit Hexagon experience and are still cheap should simply play the original.

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